Tag Archives: keyword search

TAR vs. Keyword Search Challenge, Round 3

This iteration of the challenge, held at the Education Hub at ILTACON 2018, was structured somewhat differently from round 1 and round 2 to give the audience a better chance of beating TAR.  Instead of submitting search queries on paper, participants submitted them through a web form using their phones, which allowed them to repeatedly tweak their queries and resubmit them.  I executed the queries in front of the participants, so they could see the exact recall achieved (since all documents were marked as relevant or non-relevant by a human reviewer in advance) almost instantaneously and they could utilize the performance information for their queries and the queries of other participants to guide improvements to their queries. This actually gave the participants an advantage over what they would experience in a real e-discovery project since performance measurements would normally require human evaluation of a random sample from the search output, which would make execution of several iterations of a query guided by performance evaluations very expensive in terms of review labor.  The audience got those performance evaluations for free even though the goal was to compare recall achieved for equal amounts of document review effort.  On the other hand, the audience did still have the disadvantages of having limited time and no familiarity with the documents.

As before, recall was evaluated for the top 3000 and top 6000 documents, which was enough to achieve high recall with TAR (even with the training documents included, so total review effort for TAR and the search queries was the same).  Audience members were free to work on any of the three topics that were used in previous versions of the challenge: law, medical industry, or biology.  Unfortunately, the audience was much smaller than previous versions of the challenge, and nobody chose to submit a query for the biology topic.

Previously, the TAR results were achieved by using the TAR 3.0 workflow to train with 200 cluster centers, documents were sorted based on the resulting relevance scores, and top-scoring documents were reviewed until the desired amount of review effort was expended without allowing predictions to be updated during that review (e.g., review of 200 training docs plus 2,800 top scoring docs to get the “Top 3,000” result).  I’ll call this TAR 3.0 SAL (SAL = Simple Active Learning, meaning the system is not allowed to learn during the review of top-scoring documents).  In practice you wouldn’t do that.  If you were reviewing top-scoring documents, you would allow the system to continue learning (CAL).  You would use SAL only if you were producing top-scoring documents without reviewing them since allowing learning to continue during the review would reduce the amount of review needed to achieve a desired level of recall.  I used TAR 3.0 SAL in previous iterations because I wanted to simulate the full review in front of the audience in a few seconds and TAR 3.0 CAL would have been slower.  This time, I did the TAR calculations in advance and present both the SAL and CAL results so you can see how much difference the additional learning from CAL made.

One other difference compared to previous versions of the challenge is how I’ve labeled the queries below.  This time, the number indicates which participant submitted the query and the letter indicates which one of his/her queries are being analyzed (if the person submitted more than one) rather than indicating a tweaking of the query that I added to try to improve the result.  In other words, all variations were tweaks done by the audience instead of by me.  Discussion of the results follows the tables, graphs, and queries below.

Recall
Medical Industry Top 3,000 Top 6,000
1a 3.0%
1b 17.4%
TAR 3.0 SAL 67.3% 83.7%
TAR 3.0 CAL 80.7% 88.5%

 

Recall
Law Top 3,000 Top 6,000
2 1.0%
3a 36.1% 42.3%
3b 45.3% 60.1%
3c 47.2% 62.6%
4 11.6% 13.8%
TAR 3.0 SAL 63.5% 82.3%
TAR 3.0 CAL 77.8% 87.8%

tar_vs_search3_medical

tar_vs_search3_law

 

1a)  Hospital AND New AND therapies
1b)  Hospital AND New AND (physicians OR doctors)
2)   Copyright AND mickey AND mouse
3a)  Schedule OR Amendments OR Trial OR Jury OR Judge OR Circuit OR Courtroom OR Judgement
3b)  Amendments OR Trial OR Jury OR Judge OR Circuit OR Courtroom OR Judgement OR trial OR law OR Patent OR legal
3c)  Amendments OR Trial OR Jury OR Judge OR Circuit OR Courtroom OR Judgement OR trial OR law OR Patent OR legal OR Plaintiff OR Defendant
4)  Privacy OR (Personally AND Identifiable AND Information) OR PII OR (Protected AND Speech)

TAR won across the board, as in previous iterations of the challenge.  Only one person submitted queries for the medical industry topic.  His/her revised query did a better job of finding relevant documents, but still returned fewer than 3,000 documents and fared far worse than TAR — the query was just not broad enough to achieve high recall.  Three people submitted queries on the law topic.  One of those people revised the query a few times and got decent results (shown in green), but still fell far short of the TAR result, with review of 6,000 documents from the best query finding fewer relevant documents than review of half as many documents with TAR 3.0 SAL (TAR 3.0 CAL did even better).  It is unfortunate that the audience was so small, since a larger audience might have done better by learning from each other’s submissions.  Hopefully I’ll be able to do this with a bigger audience in the future.

TAR vs. Keyword Search Challenge, Round 2

During my presentation at the South Central eDiscovery & IG Retreat I challenged the audience to create keyword searches that would work better than technology-assisted review (predictive coding).  This is similar to the experiment done a few months earlier.  See this article for more details.  The audience again worked in groups to construct keyword searches for two topics.  One topic, articles on law, was the same as last time.  The other topic, the medical industry, was new (it replaced biology).

Performance was evaluated by comparing the recall achieved for equal amounts of document review effort (the population was fully categorized in advance, so measurements are exact, not estimates).  Recall for the top 3000 keyword search matches was compared to recall from reviewing 202 training documents (2 seed documents plus 200 cluster centers using the TAR 3.0 method) and 2798 documents having the highest relevance scores from TAR.  Similarly, recall from the top 6000 keyword search matches was compared to recall from review of 6000 documents with TAR.  Recall from all documents matching a search query was also measured to find the maximum recall that could be achieved with the query.

The search queries are shown after the performance tables and graphs.  When there is an “a” and “b” version of the query, the “a” version was the audience’s query as-is, and the “b” query was tweaked by me to remove restrictions that were limiting the number of relevant documents that could be found.  The results are discussed at the end of the article.

Medical Industry Recall
Query Total Matches Top 3,000 Top 6,000 All
1a 1,618 14.4% 14.4%
1b 3,882 32.4% 40.6% 40.6%
2 7,684 30.3% 42.2% 46.6%
3a 1,714 22.4% 22.4%
3b 16,756 32.7% 44.6% 71.1%
4a 33,925 15.3% 20.3% 35.2%
4b 58,510 27.9% 40.6% 94.5%
TAR 67.3% 83.7%

 

Law Recall
Query Total Matches Top 3,000 Top 6,000 All
5 36,245 38.8% 56.4% 92.3%
6 25,370 51.9% 72.4% 95.7%
TAR 63.5% 82.3%

tar_vs_search2_medical

tar_vs_search2_law

 

1a) medical AND (industry OR business) AND NOT (scientific OR research)
1b) medical AND (industry OR business)
2) (revenue OR finance OR market OR brand OR sales) AND (hospital OR health OR medical OR clinical)
3a) (medical OR hospital OR doctor) AND (HIPPA OR insurance)
3b) medical OR hospital OR doctor OR HIPPA OR insurance
4a) (earnings OR profits OR management OR executive OR recall OR (board AND directors) OR healthcare OR medical OR health OR hospital OR physician OR nurse OR marketing OR pharma OR report OR GlaxoSmithKline OR (united AND health) OR AstraZeneca OR Gilead OR Sanofi OR financial OR malpractice OR (annual AND report) OR provider OR HMO OR PPO OR telemedicine) AND NOT (study OR research OR academic)
4b) earnings OR profits OR management OR executive OR recall OR (board AND directors) OR healthcare OR medical OR health OR hospital OR physician OR nurse OR marketing OR pharma OR report OR GlaxoSmithKline OR (united AND health) OR AstraZeneca OR Gilead OR Sanofi OR financial OR malpractice OR (annual AND report) OR provider OR HMO OR PPO OR telemedicine
5) FRCP OR Fed OR litigation OR appeal OR immigration OR ordinance OR legal OR law OR enact OR code OR statute OR subsection OR regulation OR rules OR precedent OR (applicable AND law) OR ruling
6) judge OR (supreme AND court) OR court OR legislation OR legal OR lawyer OR judicial OR law OR attorney

As before, TAR won across the board, but there were some surprises this time.

For the medical industry topic, review of 3000 documents with TAR achieved higher recall than any keyword search achieved with review of 6000 documents, very similar to results from a few months ago.  When all documents matching the medical industry search queries were analyzed, two queries did achieve high recall (3b and 4b, which are queries I tweaked to achieve higher recall), but they did so by retrieving a substantial percentage of the 100,000 document population (16,756 and 58,510 documents respectively).  TAR can reach any level of recall by simply taking enough documents from the sorted list—TAR doesn’t run out of matches like a keyword search does.  TAR matches the 94.6% recall that query 4b achieved (requiring review of 58,510 documents) with review of only 15,500 documents.

Results for the law topic were more interesting.  The two queries submitted for the law topic both performed better than any of the queries submitted for that topic a few months ago.  Query 6 gave the best results, with TAR beating it by only a modest amount.  If all 25,370 documents matching query 6 were reviewed, 95.7% recall would be achieved, which TAR could accomplish with review of 24,000 documents.  It is worth noting that TAR 2.0 would be more efficient, especially at very high recall.  TAR 3.0 gives the option to produce documents without review (not utilized for this exercise), plus computations are much faster due to there being vastly fewer training documents, which is handy for simulating a full review live in front of an audience in a few seconds.

TAR vs. Keyword Search Challenge

During my presentation at the NorCal eDiscovery & IG Retreat I challenged the audience to create keyword searches that would work better than technology-assisted review (predictive coding) for two topics.  Half of the room was tasked with finding articles about biology (science-oriented articles, excluding medical treatment) and the other half searched for articles about current law (excluding proposed laws or politics).  I ran one of the searches against TAR in Clustify live during the presentation (Clustify’s “shadow tags” feature allows a full document review to be simulated in a few minutes using documents that were pre-categorized by human reviewers), but couldn’t do the rest due to time constraints.  This article presents the results for all the queries submitted by the audience.

The audience had limited time to construct queries (working together in groups), they weren’t familiar with the data set, and they couldn’t do sampling to tune their queries, so I’m not claiming the exercise was comparable to an e-discovery project.  Still, it was entertaining.  The topics are pretty simple, so a large percentage of the relevant documents can be found with a pretty simple search using some broad terms.  For example, a search for “biology” would find 37% of the biology documents.  A search for “law” would find 71% of the law articles.  The trick is to find the relevant documents without pulling in too many of the non-relevant ones.

To evaluate the results, I measured the recall (percentage of relevant documents found) from the top 3,000 and top 6,000 hits on the search query (3% and 6% of the population respectively).  I’ve also included the recall achieved by looking at all docs that matched the search query, just to see what recall the search queries could achieve if you didn’t worry about pulling in a ton of non-relevant docs.  For the TAR results I used TAR 3.0 trained with two seed documents (one relevant from a keyword search and one random non-relevant document) followed by 20 iterations of 10 top-scoring cluster centers, so a total of 202 training documents (no control set needed with TAR 3.0).  To compare to the top 3,000 search query matches, the 202 training documents plus 2,798 top-scoring documents were used for TAR, so the total document review (including training) would be the same for TAR and the search query.

The search engine in Clustify is intended to help the user find a few seed documents to get active learning started, so it has some limitations.  If the audience’s search query included phrases, they were converted an AND search enclosed in parenthesis.  If the audience’s query included a wildcard, I converted it to a parenthesized OR search by looking at the matching words in the index and selecting only the ones that made sense (i.e., I made the queries better than they would have been with an actual wildcard).  I noticed that there were a lot of irrelevant words that matched the wildcards.  For example, “cell*” in a biology search should match cellphone, cellular, cellar, cellist, etc., but I excluded such words.  I would highly recommend that people using keyword search check to see what their wildcards are actually matching–you may be pulling in a lot of irrelevant words.  I removed a few words from the queries that weren’t in the index (so the words shown all actually had an impact).  When there is an “a” and “b” version of the query, the “a” version was the audience’s query as-is, and the “b” query was tweaked by me to retrieve more documents.

The tables below show the results.  The actual queries are displayed below the tables.  Discussion of the results is at the end.

Biology Recall
Query Total Matches Top 3,000 Top 6,000 All Matches
1 4,407 34.0% 47.2% 47.2%
2 13,799 37.3% 46.0% 80.9%
3 25,168 44.3% 60.9% 87.8%
4a 42 0.5% 0.5%
4b 2,283 20.9% 20.9%
TAR 72.1% 91.0%
Law Recall
Query Total Matches Top 3,000 Top 6,000 All Matches
5a 2,914 35.8% 35.8%
5b 9,035 37.2% 49.3% 60.6%
6 534 2.9% 2.9%
7 27,288 32.3% 47.1% 79.1%
TAR 62.3% 80.4%

tar_vs_search_biology

tar_vs_search_law

1) organism OR microorganism OR species OR DNA

2) habitat OR ecology OR marine OR ecosystem OR biology OR cell OR organism OR species OR photosynthesis OR pollination OR gene OR genetic OR genome AND NOT (treatment OR generic OR prognosis OR placebo OR diagnosis OR FDA OR medical OR medicine OR medication OR medications OR medicines OR medicated OR medicinal OR physician)

3) biology OR plant OR (phyllis OR phylos OR phylogenetic OR phylogeny OR phyllo OR phylis OR phylloxera) OR animal OR (cell OR cells OR celled OR cellomics OR celltiter) OR (circulation OR circulatory) OR (neural OR neuron OR neurotransmitter OR neurotransmitters OR neurological OR neurons OR neurotoxic OR neurobiology OR neuromuscular OR neuroscience OR neurotransmission OR neuropathy OR neurologically OR neuroanatomy OR neuroimaging OR neuronal OR neurosciences OR neuroendocrine OR neurofeedback OR neuroscientist OR neuroscientists OR neurobiologist OR neurochemical OR neuromorphic OR neurohormones OR neuroscientific OR neurovascular OR neurohormonal OR neurotechnology OR neurobiologists OR neurogenetics OR neuropeptide OR neuroreceptors) OR enzyme OR blood OR nerve OR brain OR kidney OR (muscle OR muscles) OR dna OR rna OR species OR mitochondria

4a) statistically AND ((laboratory AND test) OR species OR (genetic AND marker) OR enzyme) AND NOT (diagnosis OR treatment OR prognosis)

4b)  (species OR (genetic AND marker) OR enzyme) AND NOT (diagnosis OR treatment OR prognosis)

5a) federal AND (ruling OR judge OR justice OR (appellate OR appellant))

5b) ruling OR judge OR justice OR (appellate OR appellant)

6) amendments OR FRE OR whistleblower

7) ((law OR laws OR lawyer OR lawyers OR lawsuit OR lawsuits OR lawyering) OR (regulation OR regulations) OR (statute OR statutes) OR (standards)) AND NOT pending

TAR beat keyword search across the board for both tasks.  The top 3,000 documents returned by TAR achieved higher recall than the top 6,000 documents for any keyword search.  In other words, if documents will be reviewed before production, TAR achieves better results (higher recall) with half as much document review compared to any of the keyword searches.  The top 6,000 documents returned by TAR achieved higher recall than all of the documents matching any individual keyword search, even when the keyword search returned 27,000 documents.

Similar experiments were performed later with many similarities but also some notable differences in the results.  You can read about them here: round 2, and round 3.